Diary Doodles of a Distracted Blogger

Decided that diary is the wrong word. Even though I’m chronicling my foibles and attempts at online networking, the day of the post doesn’t imply any real order. The day of posting only illustrates what oozed to the top of my brain. The Free Dictionary defines doodle as scribbling absentmindedly. Verbal doodles are more appropriate to describe my blogging.

Prior to exploring (lurking) on various discussion boards at the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), I actually started posting some responses. A recent one discussed the appropriate/inappropriate use of social media for screening potential employees. Because I love taking the opposite view, I posited a different scenario and asked:

…finding the right fit in any recruiting and hiring situation is a two-way street. As the economy improves (albeit slowly there are signs), key employees who have the skills, experience, and knowledge that make the organization hum may choose to leave.

Potential applicants to your organization, too, can explore multiple job opportunities without personally speaking to anyone in your organization. What if a really good potential applicant decided to explore your organization’s website and social media before applying? How comfortable is it when the shoe is on the other foot?

Not only that, but it seems prudent for prospective employers to mind their Ps and Qs when using social media. Michael Wyland said:

My partner is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) and a certified senior professional in human resources (SPHR). I asked her about this issue, and she was adamant that, based on her training (including recent training), that those involved in hiring should avoid social media searches. Her opinion is that this is one of many areas of the law where the law has not kept up with technology access and capabilities.

One reason for avoiding social media searches, as has been mentioned elsewhere in this thread, is that such searches allow prospective employers to access information legally prohibited from being considered in hiring decisions. If it can be proven that a social media search was conducted, it becomes more difficult for the prospective employer to protect themselves from a hiring discrimination suit brought by an unsuccessful applicant.

The “safety valve” some employers use is to employ third-party recruiting firms to screen applicants. Some employers use temp-to-hire arrangements to allow them to see a person not *their* employee and learn all about them before making a formal hiring decision. Most of the laws and regulations protecting employment applicants envision the employer doing the hiring directly; they rarely address the actions of third parties in the hiring process.

I went to Michael’s bio and profile on ASAE to let him know about this post and realized…aaagghhh! I don’t have any Twitter or LinkedIn widgets anywhere on my own stuff! Well, maybe tomorrow.

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